Draft findings from fellowship

Research question

What is the difference that Policy Lab’s approach makes to policy making?

1 What the Lab approach is/does

Lab’s approach problematises policy making – it’s not just exploring new tools, techniques and new data. Policy Lab connects/reassembles/tweens actualities and potentialities, problems and solutions, thinking and doing, inside and outside.

The key characteristics of this approach are that it is based in:

  • Abductive discovery, through which insights, guesses, framings and concepts emerge eg ethnographic research, co-design, prototyping in the fuzzy front end of policy making.
  • Collective inquiry – through which problems and solutions co-evolve, which is participatory, and through which constituents of an issue are identified and recognised, and solutions are tested eg prototyping.
  • Recombining experiences, resources and policies – the constituents of an issue – into new (temporary) configurations.


2 What Lab approach results in – its impact which we can seek proxy measures for

Project level – Relating to the policy area

  • New insights, guesses, framings
  • Plausible concepts for artifact-experience bundles
  • Prototyped proofs of concept – “proto policies”
  • An issue team/public engaged in a collective inquiry engaging with a more ordered problem

Capabilities in within the policy profession and wider ecosystem

  • Reordered relations between actors in an issue (inside and outside an issue)
  • Reordered relations between actors and evidence
  • Reordered timings
  • Ability to set up and participate effectively in collective inquiries and early-stage abductive exploration
  • Awareness of the interdependencies between experiences, resources and policies
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Draft policy innovation logics framework

A sketch that pulls together bits of various literatures to try to make sense of why evaluating things like Policy Lab is hard (in the conventional terms of evaluation favoured by civil servants). It draws heavily on Roger Martin’s work in The Design of Business (2009) to connect the different logics required for innovation – abduction, deduction and induction – and combines this with other research in sociology and design.